Springtime Check-in with Cartoon

Hope everyone is enjoying spring! The San Francisco weather alternates between beautiful and summery and foggy and windy, so I’m getting a little of everything at the moment.

I came across a cartoon strip in the Fussy Librarian newsletter that cracked me up. Jefferson Smith is a renaissance man (not literally!) who cartoons, writes, and does software-related creative stuff. (Click here to view his strip archive: http://yourwordsworth.ca)

cartoonThe strip seemed to express beautifully what I’m sure a lot of my clients feel when I return their manuscripts with track changes… But since many folks have been appreciative of my catches, I don’t feel too bad.

I do still have some openings in May and beyond, so feel free to let me know if you need copyediting work and I’ll be happy to discuss rates and fit you in.

Cheers from Edit for Indies :)

Client spotlight: Christina Pilz’s ‘Fagin’s Boy’

Fagins-Boy-Web-3d-Book

A great read for a cold January night.

Back around November of last year, I was contacted by a writer called Christina Pilz, asking me if I was free to do a critique of her already published historical novel, Fagin’s Boy. The intriguing thing about her book was that it was a sequel to Oliver Twist with an M/M slant, where Oliver and the Artful Dodger meet again in London several years after Dickens’s novel ended and slowly become… quite intimate!

Since I love both the M/M genre and historical fiction in general, I gave Christina a quote and happily accepted the assignment. I let her know that I thought that the sexual relationship between the boys happened too suddenly in the later part of the book and that her audience would be eager to see more of the budding relationship sooner. Christina went off to do her revisions and then sent me the revised novel for proofing. The MS was over 170K, but I enjoyed Christina’s authentically Victorian writing style and the way she conveyed the harsh beauty of Dickensian London so much, I didn’t hesitate.

Flash forward to today, when the revised edition of the book is out with a new cover and, to my great surprise, Christina wrote glowingly about my editorial services on her site (http://www.christinaepilz.com/fagins-boy-revised-content/). It’s not often that clients take the time to acknowledge me in this way, and I’m extremely grateful.

Christina Pilz wrote:

“I’m somewhat loath to share her with the world as I want to keep her to myself. But I’m an indie writer who likes to pay it forward, so here you go. Her prices are reasonable, her turn-around time is excellent, and her attention to detail is top-notch.”

As I said to Ms. Pilz, there is plenty of me to go around! So please don’t hesitate to contact Edit for Indies for a quote for services such as proofreading, editing, or even a critique of your already published book…:)

Happy New Year

We’re almost at the point of seeing the old year out. I want to thank all my clients for a strong year in 2014! I feel lucky to have a varied and interesting bunch of writers who entrust their creative work to Edit for Indies.

In that spirit of gratitude, I finally went ahead and made that donation to Doctors Without Borders!:

Cheers! See you next year…

Ebola…Now a Global Crisis

Originally posted on Gabriella West:

Nasty, isn't it? Nasty, isn’t it?

I’ve been following the course of the Ebola outbreak with increasing dread. The Ebola virus was discovered in 1976 but never spread outside remote African villages till the latest outbreak in Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia, where the disease is taking a devastating toll right now.

I found this recent interview with one of the scientists who first discovered Ebola back in the ’70s. It’s definitely worth a close read. Fascinating detail: they named the virus after a river near the remote village in Zaire where the first outbreak took place.

Clearly, despite reassuring statements by the CDC, we are not ready for Ebola here in the West, either. Just look at the shabby way the poor nurse’s aide, Teresa Ramos, has been treated in Spain…she had to practically beg for medical treatment and then found out she had Ebola though the media as she…

View original 126 more words

Summer 2014 Wrap-up

TrackingaShadowThanks to everyone who participated in the writers’ poll! The results stayed fairly steady: Sci-Fi/Fantasy was number one and Romance came in at #2, followed by a tie between Literary Fiction and “Other.”

I realize that I didn’t set an option for nonfiction books, which probably make up a large chunk of the “other” responses. Due to several recent inquiries I received about working on nonfiction, self-help books particularly, I changed my rates to clarify that I charge .008 a word for these jobs. Nonfiction is very welcome—but it takes a bit more time and effort to edit, and I wanted to make sure my rates reflect that.

I hope everybody has been having a good summer! Several clients of mine released books this summer that I copyedited, including R Weir‘s first full-length mystery/thriller, “Tracking a Shadow” and Donna Flynn‘s action-packed sequel to “The Dragon’s Gem,” “Aurora’s Dragon.”

The fall should be quite busy (especially with the rollout of the new Kindle Unlimited program on Amazon), so I encourage you to contact me soon if you need editing work for fall or winter releases.

Something new: a poll for my blog readers

Having never done a poll, I’m curious to see how this turns out! Thanks in advance for answering the question.

From The Red Line: Top 7 Misused Expressions

Freelance copy editor Kate Hamill has a blog called The Red Line; her columns run on Freelancers Union, which is where I noticed them. One thing I like about her posts is that it is great to have an authoritative answer on grammar/word issues. Judging by the funny comments on her blog posts, many editors read her pieces.

Here’s the latest one, called “Top 7 Misused Expressions.”

https://www.freelancersunion.org/blog/2014/04/07/red-line-top-7-misused-expressions/

I’m sure I could think of a few to add, but I’m a bit depleted by Tax Day and I’m supposed to be editing, so I will hold off for now :)

By the way, I have yet to see anyone write “on accident.” (Shudder.)

It’s National Proofreading Day

March 8th is National Proofreading Day. I didn’t know about this—did you? It’s not on calendars (yet) and the Google doodle is still up for International Women’s Day—check it out if you haven’t, it’s a lovely, lighthearted piece. In fact, it was a new follower on my Twitter account @editforindies who alerted me to the special day.

Proofreading is an occupation that has almost disappeared from the newsroom (I should know; I’ve worked in three newsrooms!). By that I mean that wages are so low and hours so curtailed that you can’t really make a living proofreading anymore.

EditorLoveBut although I don’t work on hard copy with a red pen anymore, we live in the days of the cyber red pen, at least, and there is still a need for proofreaders, as this graphic charmingly illustrates…

I do love words, and occasionally a typo or blooper will just leap off the page. Here are a few that I wrote down over the last year or so:

Fast foot giant (almost looks right, doesn’t it?)

800 bakers walked down Wall Street (this was a tricky one, but in the very dry, technical context it was obvious that it should have been bankers!)

A lesson or two in manors… (um, manners, perhaps?)

Her umpire waist… (since this described a dress, I was stumped for a moment and then realized the author meant Empire!)

And one of my favorites: “I grabbed my books with a drool look” (I was glad to catch this one to prevent author embarrassment. Methinks the author meant droll.)

To be honest, this is the fun part of the editing/proofreading job for me. (Fussing about em dashes, serial commas, and grammatical consistency, not so much.) Proofreaders work hard and need to be obsessive, but this work can be very rewarding. So, a shout-out to my fellow proofreaders and the people who “get” what we do.

Please, Mr. Postette

Gabriella West:

Reblogging here, since this is a piece about art and writing.

Originally posted on Gabriella West:

The East Bay Express ran an interesting story last month about a Berkeley (or Oakland) man who leaves colorful Post-it notes—expressing various positive sentiments—all over town (on bikes, bus windows, cafe tables).

The man prefers to remain anonymous; the article calls him Mr. Postette. And he’s doing it for the best of reasons:

Mr. Postette said he started to leave inspirational notes mainly because he needed to be inspired. “At one point, I was feeling really unmotivated and uninspired to do anything at all, so I wrote a bunch of quotes down on Post-It Notes and put them up on my wall, in my room. I took those down, and started putting them around town.” He uses different color notes for different themes. “The past is usually green. Change is blue. Hope is yellow. A lot of them are yellow because I like yellow. Sometimes I’ll assign a…

View original 190 more words